Explore Over 89 Delicious Spanish Drinks Names For Your Next Fiesta

Spanish-speaking countries have a diverse array of drinks, each with its own unique taste and cultural importance. We’ll look at some popular beverages, typical drinks from various regions, and phrases and sayings about drinking in Spanish. Knowing these will really help you get more out of the drinking culture in Spanish-speaking places, especially during any celebration.

Popular drinks in Spanish-speaking countries

SaangriA refreshing punch

Each Spanish-speaking country has its own unique drinks that show off its culture and food traditions. In Mexico, people enjoy refreshing Aguas Frescas and the flavorful Café de Olla. These drinks are a big part of everyday life and special celebrations.

Country Drink Description
Spain Saangri A refreshing punch made from red wine, fruit juices, soda water, and fruit.
Tinto de Verano Red wine mixed with lemon soda, a simple version of sangria.
Horchata A sweet milky beverage made from tiger nuts, popular in Valencia.
Cava Spanish sparkling wine from the Catalonia region.
Sherry A fortified wine from the Jerez region, varying from dry to sweet.
Mexico Tequila Distilled spirit made from blue agave, synonymous with Mexican culture.
Mezcal Similar to tequila but made from different agaves, known for its smoky flavor.
Horchata A rice-based drink flavored with cinnamon and vanilla.
Paloma A cocktail made with grapefruit soda and tequila.
Michelada Beer cocktail with lime juice, sauces, spices, and peppers.
Argentina Mate A traditional caffeine-rich infused drink, consumed from a shared gourd.
Malbec Famous Argentine red wine, known for its deep flavor.
Fernet con Coca A mix of Fernet, a bitter herbal liqueur, and Coca-Cola.
Torrontés An aromatic white wine unique to Argentina.
Chile Pisco Grape brandy which is the base of many cocktails.
Carménère Medium-bodied red wine, considered Chile’s signature grape.
Mote con Huesillo Traditional Chilean drink of wheat and peaches cooked in sugar and cinnamon.
Colombia Aguardiente An anise-flavored liquor, very potent.
Chicha Traditional fermented or non-alcoholic maize drink.
Café de Colombia World-renowned coffee, typically served black or as ‘tinto’.
Peru Pisco Sour Cocktail made from Pisco, lime juice, syrup, egg white, and bitters.
Chicha Morada Non-alcoholic sweet beverage made from purple corn.
Inca Kola Popular soft drink known for its bright yellow color and sweet taste.

National drinks of Spanish-speaking countries

Why do national drinks matter so much in Spanish-speaking countries? These drinks capture an area’s unique tastes, history, and resources. They’re like a snapshot of the region’s heritage in a glass. Take Mexico’s tequila, for example. It’s made from the local blue agave and is loved worldwide. But it’s more than just a drink; it’s a source of national pride.

Then there’s Argentina’s yerba mate. It’s not just a beverage; it’s part of the daily social fabric. People gather and share it, strengthening community bonds. Every drink, from Chile’s pisco to Spain’s sangria, has its own story. These stories are woven from the local climate, history, and traditions. They play a big role in celebrating and keeping alive the rich cultural diversity of these places.

Phrases and idioms about drinking in Spanish

In Spanish drinks, some fun phrases show how important drinking is in the culture. Take ‘Estar como una Cuba’ — it means ‘being like a barrel,’ and it’s a funny way to say someone is very drunk.

Phrase/Idiom Meaning
Beber como una esponja To drink a lot (literally, “to drink like a sponge”).
Estar como una cuba To be very drunk (literally, “to be like a barrel”).
Echarse un trago To have a drink.
Ir de copas To go out for drinks.
Tomar una copa To have a drink.
Beber a sorbos To sip a drink.
Dar una vuelta a la manzana To take a break or go for a walk, often to clear one’s head after drinking.
A buenas horas, mangas verdes Expression used when someone arrives too late (originating from a drinking context).
Empinar el codo To drink alcohol, often excessively (literally, “to lift the elbow”).
Ser un borracho To be a drunkard.
Tomarse una copa de más To have one drink too many.
Ahogar las penas To drown one’s sorrows (often through drinking).
Ponerse pedo To get very drunk.
Chupar como un cosaco To drink heavily (literally, “to suck like a Cossack”).
Ir de botellón To engage in a street drinking party, common among young people in Spain.
Tener resaca To have a hangover.
Hacerse una cerveza To have a beer.
Pegar un pelotazo To take a big swig of an alcoholic drink.
Ser un alcohólico To be an alcoholic.
Tener una copa de más To have one drink too many.

89+ Delicious Spanish Drinks Names

Delicious Spanish Drinks

Exploring Spanish drinks is great for any party. Spain offers a wide range of drinks, including both alcoholic and non-alcoholic options.

No. Drink Name Type
1 Sangria Alcoholic
2 Horchata Non-alcoholic
3 Tinto de Verano Alcoholic
4 Clara Alcoholic
5 Rebujito Alcoholic
6 Calimocho Alcoholic
7 Cava Alcoholic
8 Sherry Alcoholic
9 Agua de Valencia Alcoholic
10 Sidra Alcoholic
11 Café con Leche Non-alcoholic
12 Carajillo Alcoholic
13 Licor 43 Alcoholic
14 Orujo Alcoholic
15 Crema Catalana Liquor Alcoholic
16 Queimada Alcoholic
17 Anis del Mono Alcoholic
18 Mosto Non-alcoholic
19 Pacharán Alcoholic
20 Vino de Naranja Alcoholic
21 Vermouth Alcoholic
22 Mahou (beer) Alcoholic
23 Estrella Galicia (beer) Alcoholic
24 Cruzcampo (beer) Alcoholic
25 San Miguel (beer) Alcoholic
26 Horchata de Chufa Non-alcoholic
27 Granizado de Limón Non-alcoholic
28 Granizado de Café Non-alcoholic
29 Gazpacho Non-alcoholic
30 Salmorejo Non-alcoholic
31 Leche Merengada Non-alcoholic
32 Batido de Fresa Non-alcoholic
33 Batido de Plátano Non-alcoholic
34 Zumo de Naranja Non-alcoholic
35 Zumo de Manzana Non-alcoholic
36 Zumo de Piña Non-alcoholic
37 Zumo de Tomate Non-alcoholic
38 Agua Fresca Non-alcoholic
39 Café Solo Non-alcoholic
40 Café Cortado Non-alcoholic
41 Té con Limón Non-alcoholic
42 Té con Menta Non-alcoholic
43 Chocolate Caliente Non-alcoholic
44 Cola Cao Non-alcoholic
45 Aquarius Non-alcoholic
46 Kas (soft drink) Non-alcoholic
47 Fanta de Limón Non-alcoholic
48 Fanta de Naranja Non-alcoholic
49 Fanta de Pomelo Non-alcoholic
50 Red Bull Non-alcoholic
51 Monster Energy Non-alcoholic
52 Tónica Non-alcoholic
53 Sprite Non-alcoholic
54 Nestea Non-alcoholic
55 Lipton Ice Tea Non-alcoholic
56 San Francisco Cocktail (mocktail) Non-alcoholic
57 Limonada Non-alcoholic
58 Batido de Mango Non-alcoholic
59 Batido de Melocotón Non-alcoholic
60 Menta Poleo Non-alcoholic
61 Manzanilla Tea Non-alcoholic
62 Sangría Blanca Alcoholic
63 Rioja (red wine) Alcoholic
64 Tempranillo (red wine) Alcoholic
65 Garnacha (red wine) Alcoholic
66 Albariño (white wine) Alcoholic
67 Verdejo (white wine) Alcoholic
68 Txakoli (white wine) Alcoholic
69 Bobal (red wine) Alcoholic
70 Palo Cortado (sherry) Alcoholic
71 Amontillado (sherry) Alcoholic
72 Fino (sherry) Alcoholic
73 Manzanilla (sherry) Alcoholic
74 Ribera del Duero (red wine) Alcoholic
75 Priorat (red wine) Alcoholic
76 Montilla-Moriles (white wine) Alcoholic
77 Rueda (white wine) Alcoholic
78 Jerez (sherry) Alcoholic
79 Málaga (dessert wine) Alcoholic
80 Valdepeñas (red wine) Alcoholic
81 Somontano (red wine) Alcoholic
82 Toro (red wine) Alcoholic
83 Cariñena (red wine) Alcoholic
84 Bierzo (red wine) Alcoholic
85 Rías Baixas (white wine) Alcoholic
86 Condado de Huelva (white wine) Alcoholic
87 Pla de Bages (red wine) Alcoholic
88 Alella (white wine) Alcoholic
89 Terra Alta (white wine) Alcoholic
90 Monastrell (red wine) Alcoholic
91 Garnatxa (red wine) Alcoholic
92 Mencía (red wine) Alcoholic
93 Godello (white wine) Alcoholic
94 Pedro Ximénez (sherry) Alcoholic

Conclusion

Looking at over 89 Spanish drinks opens our eyes to how diverse and rich Spanish cultures are. Each drink, from Aguas Frescas to Orujo, isn’t just tasty—it tells a story. It’s about tradition, history, and the people who made them first. Exploring these drinks helps us understand and appreciate different cultures. It’s a fun and tasty way to learn, especially when hanging out and celebrating.

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